Middle Eastern Music Show #6 Podcast.

February 23, 2016: Middle Eastern Music Show #6 Podcast.

Welcome, newcomers to these podcasts. My Middle-Eastern shows include music from Central Asia and Africa, as well, which is similar in style or sound to music from the Middle-Eastern countries. Sometimes, music from The Balkans is also included.

Playlist:

1. Je Veux Vivre (I Want To Live), 3:13.
2. Nkhalik Fi Hwak, 4:42.
3. Elhob, 5:14.
4. Lafera9e Se3ib, 5:52.
5. Lamouni (Ligharou Meni), 4:36.
6. Chapandozi Qalandar (Vagabond Tunes), 3:58.
6. The Incredible Tale Of Love, 10:48.
7. Tichareten, 6:20.
8. Ayam Matetawadsh, 3:49.
9. Azima Lela, 4:38.
10. Bagishlaram Seni, 5:20.
11. Ancient Sky, 6:56.
12. Northern Lights, 3:08.
13. Je Chanterai Toujours La Musique Orientale, 8:30.
14. Shirin Shirinam (Dear (Sweetheart)), 5:09.
15. Sari Gelin, 4:45.
16. Your Love Is My Cure, 6:49.
17. Lalaii (Lullaby for the Awakening), 3:48.
18. Valeh, 4:15.
19. Tamanaye Vesal (How long have you longed for union with the One), 5:35.
20. Hanina, 4:43.  
21. Hayr, 4:50.
22. Aube Rouge A Grozny, 4:18.
23. Bektob Esmak Ya Habibi, 4:41.
24. La Ta Zhoulih, 4:57.
25. Resistance, 5:26.
26. Taxim & Tsifteteli, 4:58.
27. Desse Barama (Peace), 4:36.
28. Kurd, 2:26.
29. Dis Moi Pourquoi, 3:44.
30. Maandi Hadja Fi Nass, 5:56.

Total Time, 2:36:42 .

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This podcast Music Show is dedicated to the memory of Lili Boniche (Élie Boniche, 1921 – March 6, 2008) .

“The Crooner of the Casbah,” Algerian-born Lili Boniche emerged as one of the premier cabaret acts in postwar Paris, honing an utterly unique fusion of North African folk, French chanson, and Latin jazz rhythms he called “francarabe.” Born in Algiers on April 29, 1922, to a Sephardic family of Andalusian descent, Boniche was a nine-year-old lute prodigy when a chance encounter with Algerian Haouzi master Saoud L’Oranais led to an invitation to join his group on tour — remarkably, Boniche‘s parents consented, and their child spent the next three years traveling across North Africa under L’Oranais’ tutelage before returning home in 1935 to study Arab classical music. At 15, Boniche convinced Radio Alger to award him a weekly live showcase, and he also became a fixture at local social events, over time shifting away from the Arabic shaabi tradition to write original songs informed by jazz, flamenco, mambo, and rhumba.

-from the Bio at Lili Boniche.

ME#6show.00boniche3.1206261254

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